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Home repair tips

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Author Topic: Home repair tips  (Read 581 times)
wizer
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« on: February 20, 2009, 01:27:52 pm »

This one is probably found in every home.

You see the nailheads popping out of the sheetrock due to the natural settling that occurs over time.

Drywall Nail Pops

Pops occur when lumber shrinks and exposes the shank of a nail or screwPressure on the loose drywall panel causes the head of the fastener to pop through.

To repair, drive a drywall screw about 1 1/2 inches above or below the pop on the same stud. Press the panel firmly against the framing as you set the screw. Next, remove or reset the popped fastener. If the surface is damaged, use mesh tape to strengthen and conceal the repair. "Compared with paper tape, mesh trowels out thinner."

Improper fastener length can also contribute to the problem. When installing drywall, make sure the screws penetrate the stud by at least 5/8 inch; nails should penetrate the stud by at least 7/8 inch. Don't set the fastener too deep; tearing the paper surface also reduces the holding power of the fastener. "Do it right the first time," urges Ferguson. "Use a screw gun and wallboard adhesive. Applying adhesive reduces the number of fasteners needed."

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« Last Edit: February 20, 2009, 01:37:04 pm by wizer » Report Spam   Logged

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wizer
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« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2009, 01:37:37 pm »

Asbestos siding

2. Asbestos Siding

"Many contractors have misled homeowners by claiming that all asbestos-containing materials in homes must be removed," says Ken Giles, spokesman for the Consumer Product Safety Commission. This may be true for loose or damaged materials, but the best way to handle asbestos siding is to leave it alone. Shingles contain nonfriable asbestos, which means that the fibers aren't released unless they're sawed, drilled, cut or broken.

Other remedies include encapsulating or covering the siding. To encapsulate, paint the siding with a latex masonry primer and high-quality latex paint. But don't sand or scrape the shingles. To prepare the siding, just scrub with a soap-and-water solution, then rinse with a hose.

To cover asbestos siding, install insulation board and vinyl siding over the shingles. Make sure screws penetrate at least 3/4 inch into the wall studs.

Removal is the most expensive solution, and should be the last resort unless it's required by state or local regulations, or if you're considering a major exterior renovation, such as a large addition. Asbestos removal must be done by a certified contractor (look under "Asbestos" in the yellow pages). Improper removal is illegal and increases the health risks to you and your family.
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Firecrotch
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« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2009, 01:44:37 pm »

Reading anything about home renos gives me nightmares.
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wizer
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« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2009, 02:13:22 pm »

Reading anything about home renos gives me nightmares.

It doesn't have to be that bad!

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Firecrotch
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« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2009, 02:23:23 pm »

I went through one year of home renos. Never again.
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wizer
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« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2009, 02:37:46 pm »

This next one..sagging floors...was a problem in the home I lived in before I moved out at the end of my marriage. I removed 2 support columns in the basement (after reinforcing the header with steel plates that ran along each side of it the length of the basement. Even with the reinforcement, the entire first floor of the house settled almost an inch, which caused some cracks in the corners of the upstairs walls and along door frames..and it caused the doors to become out of level..which can cause them to swing open and/or not lock properly. I ended up putting back one support post using the adjustable column (discussed below), and that was enough to firm it all back up again. During my divorce, the ex tried to make the case that the house was in danger of collapsing and requested a whole bunch of money to "fix" everything. An engineer who was appointed by the court found everything to be ok..and when the house was eventually sold the buyers engineer found no problems with my work either..but I digress...

This next repair sounds major, and if a contractor was to do it, it could cost tens of thousands of dollars, but in fact it's really not that complicated and is usually not beyond the abilities of the average homeowner.

Sagging Floors

Sagging or sloping floors could be the result of inadequate support beams that are deflecting or failing. Rotted sills or an inadequate foundation are other causes. In addition to affecting the floor, these conditions can cause wall cracks and make doors and windows impossible to open.

According to Dr. Sarah Kirby, housing specialist at the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service in Raleigh, sagging upper floors and those caused by insect or water damage should be looked at by a contractor. You can sometimes correct minor sags on the first floor yourself with a pair of screw-type jack posts and a wood or steel beam to bridge the jacks, but this procedure is difficult and somewhat risky.

The posts need a very firm foundation. Even if you have a 4-inch concrete slab, you still need to create a concrete pier pad for the jack that's 18 to 24 inches square and at least 12 inches deep.

Once these pier pads have cured and the jacks are in place, begin by raising the floor slowly, as little as a quarter turn per week. Jacking slowly allows for settling without serious disruptions or sudden stress. Lifting might create additional wall cracks and change door and window margins.
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wizer
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« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2009, 02:42:06 pm »

I went through one year of home renos. Never again.

When a contractor is doing it...it sucks..you gotta wait for them to show up, watch for incompetence, laziness, shoddy work, even scams.

I've always done renovations myself, everything from demolition, framing, electrical, plumbing..and if there's something I don't know how to do, I know who to call, and I'm right there watching everything they do.

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Firecrotch
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« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2009, 02:52:49 pm »

When a contractor is doing it...it sucks..you gotta wait for them to show up, watch for incompetence, laziness, shoddy work, even scams.

I've always done renovations myself, everything from demolition, framing, electrical, plumbing..and if there's something I don't know how to do, I know who to call, and I'm right there watching everything they do.



My bf did most of the work himself. I hate living in disorganized or messy spaces. That's the primary reason why I hate renos.
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wizer
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« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2009, 02:56:09 pm »

My bf did most of the work himself. I hate living in disorganized or messy spaces. That's the primary reason why I hate renos.

I can understand that. Especially when it involves open walls, exposed insulation and wires..whenever I was in the middle of a major project my mind would always be going..I would even dream about the construction...lol..it helps to try to isolate the areas of work if possible, work in smaller sections if you can..and think about how nice the finished result is going to be.

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wizer
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« Reply #9 on: February 20, 2009, 02:58:14 pm »

Peeling Exterior Paint

"The main cause of paint failure is inadequate prep work," says Doug Hanhner, team leader/supervisor of the Benjamin Moore Paints Product Information Center in Flanders, New Jersey. Glossy surfaces must be sanded; otherwise your new paint will start coming off in sheets with the first major change in temperature. Another common problem is moisture getting behind paint and working through the surface. After power washing your house, allow at least 14 days for the siding and sheathing to dry before painting. Occasionally, moisture escaping through walls (especially in the kitchen and baths) can cause paint to peel.

Painting too early in spring or too late in fall can also cause paint to fail prematurely. Even though it may feel dry to the touch in a day or two, latex paint needs to remain above 50 degrees F for at least 14 days in order to cure properly.

To deal with peeled paint, scrape down to a solid base (preferably bare wood), and apply an alkyd primer. Alkyds penetrate deeper and adhere better than latex primer. "Latex primers breathe better, but alkyds prevent moisture from getting trapped between the primer and base, which can also lead to paint failure," explains Hanhner.

Apply two topcoats to build up a sufficiently thick skin. When rolling or spraying, you should also "back brush" to help "seat" the paint, which creates a stronger mechanical bond with the surface.
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Firecrotch
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« Reply #10 on: February 20, 2009, 03:06:59 pm »

I can understand that. Especially when it involves open walls, exposed insulation and wires..whenever I was in the middle of a major project my mind would always be going..I would even dream about the construction...lol..it helps to try to isolate the areas of work if possible, work in smaller sections if you can..and think about how nice the finished result is going to be.



All of the work is done now so it's no longer an issue.
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wizer
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« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2009, 03:59:26 pm »

All of the work is done now so it's no longer an issue.

Unless you move again...

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Firecrotch
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« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2009, 04:50:46 pm »

Our next house will be a pre-fab. The contractors can do everything. Of course my bf will be there to supervise everything. lol.
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